“… I seek many kinds of pleasures in poetry — of story and discourse, of sound and rhythm, of lyric subjectivity and dispersal of lyric subjectivity, of disjunctiveness and discursiveness, familiar and unfamiliar form, heteroglossia and suburban historiography, archival erudition and crude wit, the strangeness of idioms unknown, the commonplace perfectly deployed to re-emerge into value and clarity, the exotic for its own sake, the ephemeral and everyday, the imagination in extremis, all that I don’t know and don’t know I want to, language loping back and forth across the boundaries of sense and nonsense — even sometimes, God forbid, the well-turned phrase.”

— from Keith Tuma’s¬†enlightening & hugely readable¬†Fishing by Obstinate Isles: Modern and Postmodern Poetry and American Readers